American Surgical Association Annual Meeting
Search Meeting Site Only
 
Main ASA Website
Current Meeting Home
Final Program
Past & Future Meetings

 

 

Back to 2016 Annual Meeting


Are Patient-Reported Outcomes Correlated with Clinical Outcomes following Surgery? A Population-Based Study
Jennifer F Waljee*, Amir Ghaferi*, Jonathan Finks*, Ruth Cassidy*, Oliver Varban*, Noelle Carlozzi*, Justin Dimick*
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI

Objectives: Although surgical quality is typically measured by clinical outcomes, patient-reported outcomes could provide a unique perspective regarding performance, particularly for common, low-risk procedures. We sought to evaluate the extent to which patient-reported outcomes are distinct from clinical outcomes, and the correlation between clinical events and quality of life following bariatric surgery.
Methods: We captured 30-day complication rates and 1-year outcomes (weight loss, comorbidity resolution), among 11,420 patients who underwent bariatric surgery between 2009 through 2013 from 39 hospitals participating in the Michigan Bariatric Surgery Collaborative. Quality of life was measured by the Health and Activities Limitations Index (HALex) and Bariatric Quality of Life index (BQL) preoperatively and at 1 year. We used linear regression to determine the association between quality of life, complications, comorbidity resolution, and weight loss, adjusting for patient factors and procedure.
Results: Risk adjusted hospital rankings based on either HALex or BQL scores were not correlated with rankings based on complications. However, both HALex score (R2 =0.24, p<0.002) and BQL score (R2=0.44; p<0.001) were correlated with hospital ranking by weight loss, and hospitals that achieved greater average weight loss also achieved higher rankings by these measures. BQL score was correlated with comorbidity resolution (R2=0.16; p<0.01). After accounting for clinical outcomes, between 14% - 44% of the variation in patient-reported outcomes remained unexplained.
Conclusions: Patient-reported outcomes are not correlated with early perioperative events, but are correlated with clinical effectiveness following bariatric surgery. A comprehensive approach to capturing surgical quality should incorporate both clinical and patient-reported outcomes.


Back to 2016 Annual Meeting


© 2022 American Surgical Association. All Rights Reserved. Privacy Policy.