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Underrepresented Minorities In Surgical Residencies: Where Are They? A Call To Action To Increase The Pipeline
*Cherisse Berry, *Ajaratu Keshinro, *Charles DiMaggio, *Spiros Frangos, *Marko Bukur, *Russell Berman, *Akuezunkpa Ude Welcome, Leon Pachter
NYU Langone Health, New York, NY

Objective:
The application and matriculation rate of underrepresented minorities (URMs) to medical school has remained low and unchanged over the last three decades. The objective of this study is to evaluate the demographic trend of general surgery applicants and graduates over the last 13 years.
Methods:
The Electronic Residency Application Service (ERAS) to General Surgery Residency and the Graduate Medical Education Survey of graduating general surgery residents were retrospectively reviewed (2005-2018). Data were stratified by race and descriptive statistics were performed.
Results:
Out of 71,699 ERAS applicants to general surgery residencies and 24,893 general surgery residency graduates, Whites followed by Asians represented the highest percentage of applicants (n=31,197, 43.8% and n=16,602, 23.1%) and graduates (n= 15,239, 61% and n= 4,804, 19% respectively) over the last decade. For URMs, the application rate (n=8,603, 11.6%, p<0.00001) and graduation rate (n= 2508, 10%, p<0.00001) have remained significantly low when compared to Whites and Asians (Figure 1). In one-way ANOVA, attrition rates between URMs (3.6%), Whites (2.6%) and Asians (2.9%) were statistically significantly different (p=0.001), with significant differences limited to those between URMs vs. Whites (p=0.009) or Asians (p=0.07).
Conclusion:
A significant disparity in the application, graduation, and attrition rates for general surgery residency exists among URMs. A call to action is needed to re-examine and improve prior recommendations/paradigms to increase the number of URMs in the surgery training pipeline.


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